Reclaim the Night

Our supporters

Reclaim The Night is organised by the London Feminist Network

Our supporters include:

(click the thumbnail to visit their websites)

Abortion Rights

Abortion Rights

AVA

Against Violence and Abuse

Apna Haq

Apna Haq

BECTU

BECTU

Caroline Lucas MP

Caroline Lucas MP

demand change

Demand Change

BECTU

Diane Abbott MP

EVAWC

End Violence Against Women
coalition

Equality_Now

Equality Now

Forward

Forward

GMB

GMB

IKWRO

Iranian and Kurdish Women’s Rights Organisation

Lilith_Project

Lilith Project

Musicians' Union

Musicians’ Union

NASUWT

NASUWT

NUS_WC

NUS Women’s Campaign

NUT

National Union of Teachers

Object

Object

PCS

Public and Commercial Services union

Refuge

Refuge

Southall_BS

Southall Black Sisters

TFL

Transport for London

Truth_About_Rape

Truth About Rape

TUC

Trades Union Congress

UCU

University and College Union

Unison

UNISON

Unison

Vera Media

White_Ribbon

White Ribbon Campaign UK

WAFE

Women’s Aid Federation of England

WAST

Women Asylum Seekers Together

WILPF

Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom

WNC

Women’s National Commission

WRC

Women’s Resource Centre


Home

Messages of support

“The fewer the people who know the truth about rape, the more it hurts each one. We should not put the burden on victims speaking out to accomplish change. We should not need to hear what has been said so many times already. It is up to us to give Reclaim The Night meaning, and we can only do that if we take the truth of their words and make it the truth of our behaviour.”

Alice Vachss
Author of "Sex Crimes: Ten Years on the Front Line Prosecuting Rapists and Confronting Their Collaborators"


“Women should feel safe walking Britain’s streets at anytime of night or day, this is a basic human right that should be fiercely protected by government. ‘Reclaim the Night’ demands this right for women and I wholeheartedly support it. A woman is absolutely never to blame for a sexual attack or rape. At this time of media hysteria about young girls binge-drinking and pitiful conviction rates for rapists ‘Reclaim the Night’ has never been more important.”

Mary Honeyball MEP
Labour Spokesperson in the European Parliament Women’s Rights Committee


“I’m honoured to be able support this year’s Reclaim the Night, which I hope will send out a strong message to the public and to local authorities that the streets need to be made a great deal safer for women and girls. Sadly, despite international and national initiatives, there remains a global crisis of gendered violence. Not enough is being done to care for the victims, adequately punish the perpetrators, and to make this sort of violence absolutely unacceptable. Governments must ensure that more is done to support the victims of rape and sexual abuse, male intimidation and violent attacks of all kinds. Our government must also urgently address the funding crisis faced by many specialist support agencies like Rape Crisis centres, which offer enormous support to women when they are most vulnerable.”

Dr Caroline Lucas MEP
Green Party


“Imagine the future — imagine a city that in its everyday comings and goings celebrates women rather than exploits them, where the streets are not only secure but sweet, places of safety and public pleasure, where both women and men, the genders and the generations experience respect.

“That’s the future we want. That’s why it’s worth joining Reclaim the Night.”

Beatrix Campbell
Writer and Broadcaster


“At a time when people often assume that feminism is dead, it is marvellous to see women of all ages and from all backgrounds raising their voices in this way. Reclaim the Night reminds us that women are still angry, but more importantly, it reminds us that women are still able to create change.”

Natasha Walter
Author of "The New Feminism"


“I was fortunate to attend the gathering after the November 2007 Reclaim the Night March. It was a wonderful and powerful event, with eloquent speakers and thrilling performances, including a rock group named Dworkin (a tribute that deeply moved me). There was an extraordinary energy in the room. I was especially pleased to see so many young men who were also at that gathering in support. (The march itself was women-only.) The anarchist feminist Emma Goldman once famously said, ‘If I can’t dance, I don’t want to be part of your revolution.’ Anyone who shares that sentiment had better not miss the next post-march Reclaim the Night event.”

John Stoltenberg
Author, activist, editor and creator of the My Strength Is Not For Hurting campaign


“Equality between women and men will never be realised as long as violence against women remains. It is up to individual women and men to speak out against the violence and to create a better world. Support Reclaim the Night and make sure your voice is heard.”

Dr Katherine Rake
Director of the Fawcett Society


“Why did I take part in the first Reclaim the night and why is it important? Because our sisters before us campaigned long and hard on these very same issues. Because over the past few years there have been assumptions that as we are living in the so-called liberated 20th century Britain that women have the same rights as men and thus have the same protection.
In reality no woman in Britain is safe, either at home or when out, from the threat of rape or sexual harassment. The fact that this is true means that once again we need to join in sisterhood, join in human-ness. To raise our voices and say that it is time to acknowledge the reality, and start once again to demand our freedoms in not having to put up with the injustices of sexual harassment and rape.”

Zlakha Ahmed
Apna Haq


“Reclaim the Night is crucially important for feminism and the campaign to end men’s violence against women. I remember being involved in organising the first London RTN in 1977, standing with Sandra MacNeill in armbands to show we were stewards, terribly anxious about who would turn up and how it would turn out. It was terrific in fact and we need not have worried. Warm sisterhood to all those on the march this year and I wish I could be with you.”

Sheila Jeffreys
Writer, academic and activist